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Year : 2020  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 225

An Unexpected Regression of the Ascending Aorta Dilatation in a Young Adult Patient


Department of Cardiology, Sultan Abdulhamid Han Training and Research Hospital, Heath Science University, Istanbul, Turkey

Date of Submission27-Oct-2019
Date of Acceptance03-Nov-2019
Date of Web Publication19-Aug-2020

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Tufan Cinar
Department of Cardiology, Sultan Abdulhamid Han Training and Research Hospital, Heath Science University, Tibbiye Street, Uskudar, Istanbul
Turkey
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jiae.jiae_50_19

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How to cite this article:
Cinar T, Hayiroğlu MI, Çiçek V, Orhan AL. An Unexpected Regression of the Ascending Aorta Dilatation in a Young Adult Patient. J Indian Acad Echocardiogr Cardiovasc Imaging 2020;4:225

How to cite this URL:
Cinar T, Hayiroğlu MI, Çiçek V, Orhan AL. An Unexpected Regression of the Ascending Aorta Dilatation in a Young Adult Patient. J Indian Acad Echocardiogr Cardiovasc Imaging [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Oct 27];4:225. Available from: https://www.jiaecho.org/text.asp?2020/4/2/225/292631

A 21-year-old healthy male patient presented to the outpatient clinic for routine cardiologic evolution before participating in a heavy military program. On his medical history, it was found that the patient was usually performing a strenuous exercise, including weight lifting and squatting. On physical examination, the patient body mass index (BMI) was 29 kg/m2, and there were no pathological heart sounds and murmurs. Electrocardiography showed a normal sinus rhythm without any pathological findings. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) was performed, providing a normal left ventricle ejection fraction, bicuspid aortic valve, mild aortic regurgitation, and ascending aorta (AA) dilatation with a diameter of 43.5 mm. Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) revealed that the AA was 44.3 mm [Figure 1]a. In addition to medical treatment of nebivolol, the patient was advised to lose weight and stop strenuous exercise. The patient was evaluated in our cardiology clinic 6 months later. The patient lost weight of approximately 15 kg during this period, and his BMI decreased to 26.5 from 29 kg/m2. Control TTE examination showed a bicuspid aortic valve and the AA dilatation with a diameter of 41 mm [Figure 1]b and [Figure 1]c. Because of a significant regression of the AA, the patient underwent CTA examination providing that the AA was 39.3 mm [Figure 1]d. A significant regression of the AA dilatation throughout 6 months period after cessation of strenuous activity is an unusual finding in daily clinical practice. This case highlights attentive evaluation of the patients with AA dilatation in regard to exercise habits.
Figure 1: (a) First computed tomographic angiography showing the ascending aorta dilatation of 44.3 mm along with subcutaneous fat thickness 14.7 mm. (b) Control transthoracic echocardiography showing bicuspid aortic valve morphology. (c) Control transthoracic echocardiography showing ascending aorta dilatation of 41 mm.(d) Control computed tomographic angiography showing the ascending aorta dilatation with a diameter of 39.3 mm as well as subcutaneous fat thickness 12.5 mm. LV: Left ventricle, LA: Left atrium, RV: Right ventricle

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Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.


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